Performing two or more actions at once ('multitasking') can cause someone with Parkinson's disease to fail one or both of the activities, and also increase the risk of falling more often. One example is walking and carrying an object, such as a cup. Recent research has shown that training dual tasks in a safe environment can be useful; and for this, there are two strategies: learning to do the two activities not simultaneously, but one after each other; or learning to perform both activities safely at the same time. On average, both strategies are equally effective (but this depends from person to person), and learning this does not coincide with an increased risk of falling in everyday life.

 

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